House of Representatives

Governor Signs Transparency in Health Care Prices Act


5/4/2021 4:14:00 PM

OKLAHOMA CITY – A bill requiring health care providers, groups and facilities to make cash prices for their most commonly provided services available to consumers was signed into law by the governor this week.

 

House Bill 1006, by Rep. Carol Bush, R-Tulsa, creates the Transparency in Health Care Prices Act. The bill passed unanimously in the House and Senate.

 

“Oklahoma consumers know what it will cost them to get groceries, to get their car serviced, to have repairs done on their homes. Basically, the price of every available product or service is available ahead of time,” Bush said. “We should expect the same for health care. This law will add give people the information they need to price compare as they consider the best treatment option.”

 

HB 1006 was authored in the Senate by Sen. Adam Pugh, R-Edmond.

 

“This is a much-needed reform to our healthcare industry that will add transparency to the costs of medical services and help those who pay cash make better informed decisions about their care,” Pugh said. “Just like any other service, healthcare costs should be provided up front, and this is a great first step towards opening up the industry to provide full data access for patients. I look forward to working more on this important issue.”

 

Under the measure, health care prices means the cash price a provider, group or facility will charge a patient for a standard service. This pricing list shall be made available either on the provider’s website or other conspicuous posting. Health care facilities also would be required to make common diagnosis and outpatient CPT codes public. The price would, of course, not include any amount in the case of complications or exceptional treatment. The document must be updated at least annually. The bill would prohibit the review of healthcare prices by any agency and interference in contracts between private parties.

 

Bush said the measure compliments new federal regulations and is supported by the Oklahoma State Medical Association.

 

Bush authored similar legislation last year, which also passed the House unanimously, but it stalled in the Senate due to COVID-19.